Tinea versicolor treatment

How is tinea versicolor treatment ? Most mild cases of tinea versicolor only need a special “shampoo” or cream. The shampoo is used like a soap on the affected skin.

If your tinea versicolor covers a large part of your body, or if it doesn’t get better with the shampoo or cream, you might need medicine that comes in pills. Your doctor will decide if you need pills.

Even after you get treated, your skin might not go back to its normal color for several months. This does not mean the treatment didn’t work. It just takes time for the skin to heal.

Tinea versicolor treatment
Tinea versicolor treatment

Pityriasis versicolor treatment 

Topical therapy is the treatment of choice for patients with tinea versicolor. Systemic therapy is typically reserved for patients with widespread or recurrent tinea versicolor, or for patients who have failed topical therapy .

High-quality comparative studies on the relative efficacy of specific treatments for tinea versicolor are limited, making the optimal approach to treatment unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials found that most trials that compared treatment regimens or therapeutic agents were underpowered to detect meaningful differences . The results suggested that longer courses of treatment, higher concentrations of topical active ingredients, and higher doses of oral antifungals may improve cure rates; however additional studies are necessary to confirm this conclusion. A table listing common treatment regimens for tinea versicolor is provided.

Tinea versicolor treatment
Tinea versicolor treatment
Tinea versicolor treatment
Tinea versicolor treatment
  • Topical azole antifungals include: clotrimazole 1%, econazole 1%, efinaconazole 10%, ketoconazole 2%, luliconazole 1%, miconazole 2%, oxiconazole 1%, sertaconazole 2%, and sulconazole 1%. For additional detail on available formulations and frequency of application refer to the Lexicomp drug-specific monographs included with UpToDate.
  • Oral therapy is reserved for patients with disease refractory to topical therapy or widespread disease that makes the application of topical therapy difficult. terbinafine and griseofulvin are not effective; oral ketoconazole is not recommended (refer to topic discussion). Doses provided are for adults.